On1 Photo RAW 2017.5 Released!

On1 have released the latest update to their Photo RAW image processing suite. You can read all about it here.

There are a number of new and improved features in the program, and key among them is further improvements in processing Fujifilm raw files. Here's a list of the many improvements, along with feature videos showing how they all work:

New Features in ON1 Photo RAW 2017.5

LENS CORRECTION — The new Lens Correction pane will automatically detect your lens and reduce distortion, chromatic aberration and peripheral fall-off.

COMPARE MODE — Select a series of photos and zoom and pan each of them at the same time.

DETAILS PANE — Sharpening and Noise Reduction is improved and has been merged into a new Details Pane for global corrections on raw photos giving better results in both areas.

IMPROVED SEARCH — Search using a variety of metadata fields and decide if the search must match all or any of the search criteria.

CLONE STAMP — The powerful clone stamp retouching tool from Layers is inside Develop and Effects as part of the non-destructive workflow.

STACKING PRESETS — The Insert Preset command is now available to stack presets in Effects. 

LIGHTROOM® MIGRATION ASSISTANT — Migrate photos, their metadata and collections. 

IMPROVED PRESET MANAGEMENT — Delete and rename preset categories as well as export categories for sharing and back-up.

CAMERA UPDATES — Added or improved support for: Apple iPad Pro 9.7, Canon EOS T7i/ 800D / Kiss X9i, Canon EOS M6, Canon EOS 77D / 9000D, Fuji X100F (compressed), Huawei Mate 9, Panasonic LX10, Sony NEX5n, Olympus Pen F, Panasonic DC-ZS70 / TZ90, Pentax KP, Olympus E-PL3, Sony Alpha ILCE 9.

Of course, there's special pricing for those who are new to On1 Photo RAW, or for those upgrading from early versions of On1 Photo products. You can find those specials at the On1 Photo RAW web site.

Half a Mind?

Back in July, and again in September of last year, I told you about Behringer's Deepmind 12 analog synthesizer. As exciting as that instrument is, and as much as I'd like to have something that resembles the old Sequential Prophet 600 I owned many years ago, the Deepmind 12 is just a touch to rich for my blood.

Behringer Deepmind 6 six-voice analog synth.

Today, however, I've learned of the Deepmind 12's new little brother, the Deepmind 6. It's kind of like having half a mind, in that it has 6 voices to the original's 12 voice architecture. Otherwise, it's nearly identically spec'd. The only other feature missing is WiFi.

Sequential Circuits Prophet 600

Like my old Prophet, it's a 3-octave analog keyboard with patch memory. The Behringer also adds four effects engines and an aftertouch keyboard, which my old Prophet lacked. Selling at about $700, it's about the same price as I paid for a used Prophet 600 ... back in about 1990.

According to Pete and Rob from Midas, it's in production now, so delivery is imminent. Looks like it may be time to get serious about selling off some unused keyboard gear....

Yeah, there's also a keyless version of the Deepmind 12, but I'm one of those guys who really doesn't want a synth without a keyboard.

Thanks to hispasonic.com and sonicstate.com for the images and video.

Lab-Box Daylight Film Processor

Most of my recent posts have been about film photography, which is kind of strange for a guy who, a few years ago, said he didn't miss film at all. Turns out, there's still something magical about film and processing, and not just for me. Film photography is enjoying somewhat of a renaissance lately, and there are several film manufacturers who are reintroducing old film stocks, or ramping up production on current stocks.

Of course, this means that support for film is on the rise, too, and this opens doors for entrepreneurs the world over. I came across the Lab-Box daylight film processor a couple of days ago, and it's really an intriguing device -- or rather, will be. Lab-Box is a kickstarter campaign by Italy's ars-imago, a shop/company located in Rome, dedicated to analog photography.

Here's a short video that shows how it works:

If you're interested in learning more, visit the kickstarter campaign. They've far exceeded their goal, raising almost five times the amount they were looking for, with 32 days left in the campaign! Remember, though, that this is a kickstarter project, and as such, even though they've succeeding in funding the project, if you participate, you still take the chance that the project might ultimately fail, and you could lose your investment. That said, with ars-imago's commitment to film photography, I think they're pretty likely to see this through.

Color me intrigued....

Processing Film on an iPad

I finally got around to editing some of the pictures from my first roll of film through the Bronica. You can see the originals in the post Roll 1619. It seemed "natural" to open the images on my computer, and edit them in On1 Photo RAW, and in fact, I did. But then I got curious about the results of editing them on my iPad instead, so I thought I'd see what I could do with my favorite iPad photo app, Snapseed.

I was actually happier with the results I saw, on screen anyway, with the Snapseed-edited images than I was with the ones I did on the computer. For instance, let's take a look at the picture of the tree and the fence:

From left to right, the original flat scan, the image edited in On1 Photo RAW, and the image editied in Snapseed. With Snapseed, I was easily able to create a pseudo-HDR image that displays good detail in both shadows and the sky. I could get a great sky in On1 Photo RAW, but I couldn't get the level of detail I wanted in the shadows. I experienced similar results with most of the other images.

The street scene I shot in Frederick was easier to deal with in On1 Photo RAW. In this case, the Snapseed image is on the left. I got a little more "punch" and character with Snapseed, but I think that has more to do with the different screens than anything else.

In any case, even with the relatively low resolution scans (they're about 4800 pixels on each side, or 23MP), there's an incredible amount of detail in these images. At 100%, you can clearly read the license plate on the white car, and even make out the times on the "No Parking" sign.

I'm really pleased with the results of the first roll through the Bronica. I'm really looking forward to using it more and more in the future.